Brennen Maps Exhibit Project

Sean Jansson

Professor Albert

FYS: Power of Maps

12/05/17

             This semester our class closely analyzed the Brennen Map Collection during the first semester. As a class we had the chance to dive deep into the truest details of the collection and found our favorite ideas about the maps. I interestingly found the importance on the blank space on a map. Looking through the collection I found almost every map has it’s own blank space to examine. While I have picked up some interest throughout our trip to the collection we have read in class some interesting authors who explore the ideas of blank space in depth and can help us further explore the ideas behind the map. It is sometimes what you can not see that is the biggest component in a map. Blank spaces are hidden values of the maps that can tell us what the author of a map would truly want you to see and what he would not want you to see. While also examining the maps I found out that the idea of maps are forever changing and can be barely ever be an exact replication of the landscape. With these two ideas in mind, I will introduce some of my previous ideas and combine them with the ever so changing map details to give us more information behind the true meaning of maps.

              “The blank page, then, is only a beginning, as opposed to the beginning.” (Turchi 29). A quote like this one in the beginning of the chapter offers us a bone to pick at. Turchi bring up some examples in the second chapter of some “Putter Outers”, famously said by Thomas Wolfe.  These are the authors that leave out information so the readers can fill in the information themselves. Turchi explains that other authors are leaving out information on purpose so the readers are constantly asked question about the missing information.  Turchi brings up John Cage’s 4’33” as an examples of a putter outter. This is a musical piece that is strictly composed of only rests. The audience is left to imagine only what the composer meaning was to create a song with no sound. This is an example of complete blank space and it goes along with Rauschenberg’s art work of two completely blank white pieces of paper. These two pieces of art leaves the people wondering what the true meaning of the piece actually was. These two examples of putter outers shows us that the amount of information given to the on goers was too minimal to interpret the true meaning of the piece of art. “Kate Chopin’s “The Storm” is highly selective, leaps through white space, and propels us into the world of the unspoken” (Turchi 51). This example is a story only gives us bits and piece of a story and at the end it tells us that everything turned out fine and everyone was happy. This leaves us in confusing asking was everyone actually happy or not. The author purpose is to make a reader prose question like these in order to define the story’s meaning. The author is trying to leave the reader with just enough information that the interpretation can happen in the reader’s mind and not on the text. All examples of these “putter outers” give us a good reason as to why an author will leave out information to get his/her meaning across toward the reader.

               While reviewing the maps in the Brennen Maps Collection, I found that all the maps were not exactly proportional but they absolutely did their best they could. Back when these maps were created, the author did their best to interpret the land and draw it to how they saw it. What we barely recognize is the fact that almost every landscape changes every second. With that being said, no map can be the exact and no map can stay updated since it is only a snapshot of the land at that time period. While reading in class, we read through a chapter that spots out the significance of the shift in the preciseness of exact map. The world is forever changing and we can not stop that from happening. We also have the knowledge that the coastlines of every continent will change due to the ever changing water level and tides. Beaches and islands can be created or taken away in a blink of a tide.

                   We as a people created the blank space – of the maps – in our minds. “The earth itself was never blank.” (Turchi 29). The earth was always full of detail but the cartographers paint the blank space in order to create a certain meaning to the landscape. For most authors of maps, it is the challenging promise to create a map that could be used for a prolonged time. Since the authenticity of the map wears due to global change, it is the map makers that deal with the issue and try to replicate that time period in it’s best stance. The map makers, just like the authors, have full control of the information given out and by that they control the meaning behind every map. Some of them leave out too much information and some put in too much information but all as one they try to bring a meaning out of the context. Map makers control the information and by that control the meaning.

 

(second paragraph from previous works cited by sean jansson)

Reading Yourself

My Writing

           I think my writing has progressed throughout this semester. I would not say that This semester has been the best writing I could have created but I can definitely say I have a better outlook and understanding towards my future writing. I think the best part of my writing is the ideas I can bring to the table. I feel I have really good ideas but my biggest struggle is getting the ideas from my head to the paper. I find it really hard for me the translate the words in my head into a sentence that a reader may understand. Also, at times, I may suffer some writers block but I think I suffer from it more than others when I’m forced to write about something I’m not interested in. I feel my writing is so free flowing when I can write about what I want. I would want to improve my writing in a lot of different ways. First I think I should focus on more of a broader topic first then narrow it down when I’m almost done researching, rather than me having a small topic and making it hard to research. Also, I think it could be helpful if I focus more on staying on topic. I often find myself drifting away from the subject I chose and start writing about something completely different. I think my writing process has changed due to the fact that I have a different mental process that I go through when I start preparing for an assignment. I think doing all the journals and analyzing my work in my journal has created a clearer viewpoint that I want to be working towards. I think my writing from the beginning of the semester looked more like my work I did in highschool and the Allentown Fair piece of writing was easier for me because it was a first hand experience. I, also, think that my last work of the interesting borders could have been redone after reading other’s papers. I feel maybe that I did not have a good enough understanding of the paper topic than I thought I did. I saw that other people had more detail and connection towards our class this semester and I thought that maybe I could have rewritten that paper with more understanding of the direction the paper should have taken. I feel like I could have used the office of writing a little more than I did since I did not use them at all and I feel like a little more communication with Michelle (the WA) would have helped me with my writing. I feel building a closer relationship Michelle could have steered my writing in a more productive and understanding path. Even though I truly do not like writing or anything that deals with writing, I have found myself catching on to the idea that not all writing has to be boring and strenuous.

Thanksgiving Map

The Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade has been the most traditional parade since the invention of the light bulb. I think personally it is a major event that is connected toward this holiday because people travel around the world just to see it’s beauty. To me and my family we watch it every year like it’s the super bowl. So for my family it is very important to us that we get to see it on thanksgiving day.Im sure it’s not only special for me but hopefully for many others too.                  

Mapping the Details rough draft

Sean Jansson

FYS:The power of maps

Professor Albert

11/12/17

 

Mapping the Details

 

A map by itself is just a picture of geographical landmarks in time in space. Authors use the power of motifs and paintings that surround the map not only to provide a beautiful border but also to help us understand the meaning behind the map. Johann Homann the Author of Planiglobii Terrestris Cum Utroq Hemisphaerio Caelesti Generalis Exhibitio, creatively draws a border around his map that matches the core beliefs and ideals at the time the map was made. This can also lead us to believe as to what the author was trying to say while in the making of his map in 1707. Homann involves the many latin ideals in his motif around the globe that are often labeled in latin.

Around the map of the globe Johann Homann includes night and day, location of stars, and winds and lands. The map he drew in 1707 is an estimation of what the globe looked like in 1707. The globe wasn’t entirely filled up with the correct spacing and so the motif help draw that attention away from the map. The author throws in a picture of Mount Etna erupting which only happened a couple decades before the making of this map which might prove a reader that this was a crucial event during that time period. SInce the map is correlated to the eruption we can tell how the world back then is connected to the gods and what they believed. Homann adds the images of the winds as his beliefs as to why the wind blows and that has a correlation to the gods and a superior being. Homann gets creative with the drawings but only draws what he knows. He draws the clouds in the sky along with the sun and the moon. Homann draws all these images to represent the meaning of the globe and their thoughts at the time.

The author decided to include the images on all four corners of the map because these images reflect on what is occurring around the world at different times. Because this map was made in 1707, perhaps the reason there are infants blowing on the upper right hand corner of the map is to give the boats power to continue their journeys. In 1707, boats were a very important source of transportation for the age of exploration and a vital tool of mapping. The winds can be related to the good and bads of the world at the time. The winds could bring storms and death with violent turns and whips, but it could also be a positive in the attitude towards travel on the sea. The better the winds the quicker the travel it makes and this was always in the mind of an explorer. Homann was obviously an explorer in some sense that the winds do matter to him. Homann add the citation of the stars which add the the fact that he is a explorer since the exploration is larger based of the constellations. This also goes along with the idea of Johann Homann being religious and thinking of the greater gods in the night sky and adding that to a global map.

 

Swiss Army Knife (make-up)

“You are my SWISS ARMY knife.”

              I fell in love for the first time when I was seven.  I went to my first football game where Eli Manning, quarterback for the New York Giants threw the game winning 61-yard touchdown.  Ever since, football has been nearly all I have thought about.  Whether I was throwing a football around with my cousins, playing in a junior recreation league, or collecting jerseys, I wanted nothing more than to be a leader and star quarterback like Eli.

            Upon starting high school, I did whatever I could to be my best at football.  I trained hard and watched game video to analyze my technique. I would lie in bed, throwing a football toward the ceiling to perfect my spiral.

To recognize my dedication, my coach called me his “SWISS ARMY knife.”  A swiss army knife contains a variety of tools, including a range of sharp blades, a screwdriver, and a can opener.  U.S soldiers relied on them during World War II because they readily fulfilled many needs, a role I would be proud to play for my team.

        Two weeks before my sophomore season, the varsity team had a scrimmage against a team we were expected to beat.  As a SWISS ARMY knife, I did not know how coach would need me, but I expected an experienced senior would play quarterback.  At half time, we were losing by two touchdowns.   Upset, the coach moved me to quarterback for my first varsity game.  To everybody’s surprise—including mine—I threw three touchdowns, including a 62-yard pass that allowed us to win.  I then became the starting quarterback, leading the seniors as an underclassman.  My hard work paid off.

         My sophomore football season was epic.  We won every game but one and qualified for the playoffs for the first time in over ten years. I was the sharp tool of the SWISS ARMY knife my coach needed.

         I received more attention those few months than I ever had.  My team honored me at pep rallies, and many upperclassmen would invite me to the diner after games.  I could not walk through the school hallways without teachers and administrators stopping me.  I was mentioned in newspapers nearly every week, and friends and relatives from all over were constantly calling to congratulate me, the SWISS ARMY knife.

         However, the next season, as a junior, could not have gone any worse. Due to graduations and injuries, we were a new and young team.  Still the SWISS ARMY knife, I volunteered to play any position to best serve the team.  Nonetheless, we lost every game.  The pep rallies and newspaper articles stopped. Many people wanted to quit.  I thought about quitting too.

          That same year, I watched Eli do an interview about why the Giants did not make the playoffs, and he expressed how he could not wait to resume training immediately.  He reminded me that football is not about playoffs, newspaper articles, or 61-yard touchdowns but the camaraderie and inherent love for the sport, a passion that as a SWISS ARMY knife I must not waver from during bad times.

Suddenly, quarterback entailed leading my team off the field too.   As the SWISS ARMY knife, I needed to restore the team’s morale, help my teammates build trust in one another, and encourage them to improve athletically. I thus watched game video with each guy individually as I had done for myself.  I congratulated people whenever they made a good play and organized team lifting sessions and dinners so we could get in better shape and bond with each other.  Win or lose, I am happy just to play this season.

         As my high school football career ends, I will continue pursuing academic and athletic interests only that I enjoy.  As a SWISS ARMY knife, I will still use my tools to better every community and organization I am in.

Collecting sources

 

  1. Encompass search; “Samuel Dunn”
    1. Dunn, Samuel. A New and Easy Method of Finding the Latitude on Sea or Land : Having Two Altitudes of the Sun and the Time Elapsed between the Two Observations, Measured by a Watch or Other Time-Keeper. by Samuel Dunn, Teacher of Mathematics. London, Printed, for the Author, 1778. INSERT-MISSING-DATABASE-NAME, INSERT-MISSING-URL.
  2. Encompass Search; “Samuel Dunn”
    1. Dunn, Samuel. A New and General Introduction to Practical Astronomy : With Its Application to Geography, in Describing the Earth. Topography and Hydrography, in Describing Places on Land and at Sea. Horometry, or the Measurement of Time. the Trial of Time-Keepers. the Obliquity of the Ecliptic. the Magnetic Variation, and Variation Charts of the Ocean. Refraction and Parallax. the Horizons of the Spheroidal Earth. Surveying the Coasts, and Correcting the Charts. Observations of Lunar Eclipses, and Jupiter’s Satellites. the Construction of Temporary, and Other Instruments ; with Tables of the Sun and Fixed Stars, and a Variety of Interesting Copper Plates. the Whole Being Designed, As a Course of Plain and Easy Instructions and Operations, Preparatory to the Discovery of the Longitude. by Samuel Dunn, Teacher of the Mathematical and Philosophical Sciences, London. London, Printed for the Author, 1774. INSERT-MISSING-DATABASE-NAME, INSERT-MISSING-URL.
  3. Encompass Search; “Samuel Dunn”
    1. Dunn, Samuel. Nautic Tables : Constructed and Calculated by Samuel Dunn, Teacher of the Mathematical Sciences London. London, Printed for the Author, 1785. INSERT-MISSING-DATABASE-NAME, INSERT-MISSING-URL.
  4. Encompass Search “mapping north america”
    1. McCoy, Roger M. On the Edge : Mapping North America’s Coasts. New York, Oxford University Press, 2012. INSERT-MISSING-DATABASE-NAME, INSERT-MISSING-URL.
  5. Encompass search “Samuel Dunn”
    1. Dunn, Samuel. The Theory and Practice of Longitude at Sea : Comprehending the Theory of the Solar System ; Phaenomena of the Moon, Other Planets and Fixed Stars ; Doctrine of Parallaxes, Time, and of the Celestial Sphere ; Use of Nautical Instruments ; New Methods for Latitude by Sun, Moon and Stars ; Longitude at Sea and Land, by All the Methods Invented ; Latitude and Longitude from Cotemporary Observations ; with Other Important Improvements. by Samuel Dunn, Teacher of the Mathematical Sciences, London. Ed. the 2nd, enlarged, improved, corrected, and revised, by the author. ed., London, Printed for the Author, at No. 1, Boar’s-Head Court, Fleet-Street, 1786. INSERT-MISSING-DATABASE-NAME, INSERT-MISSING-URL.

First thing we searched was the author of the map which was Samuel Dunn. We got a lot of resources from that encompass search which was great. We then hand picked some of the ones that might be helpful towards the story of the map. Since Samuel Dunn drew the map, reading some of his articles might help us get inside of his logic and reasoning towards making the map. Whe then did other searches like “North america 1772” or “ Map making 1772”. These might be helping in finding the time period as to when Samuel Dunn drew this might. Through some of these articles we hope to find something that gives us a piece in the story behind the map.

scavenger hunt

Scavenger Hunt

 

5.)What do the numbers 53 and 2 in the citation represent respectively?

Volume 53 issue 2

 

How aree the results from your search on historical maps organized

Find the best topic related to the search

Another way?

Date, author and source

 

9.) how many results do we get

2025

How many results

1

Why less

The second was more specific

 

11.)is this entry peeer review in the strcitess sense

No bc its a wikipedia

Is the any entry on the first page of the google results that you can be sure is peer reviewed or otherwise expertly reviewed

The second this after the wikipedia is dartmouth college and that ha to be peer review

 

8.)who is the librarian that can help

Jess denke

What citation style is specifically named

APA style

What “core resource” begins with the word Communication

Communication and Mass Media Complete

 

4.)what does it say next to call number

Trexler Library Lending Services Desk – 2 Hour Reserves

Leonard maitlin

“Brilliantly acted… more timely than ever”

 

1.)what is one likely indicator that is a scholarly book?

It has a publication from cambridge university press

What is the purpose of using quotations marks around the search items

With the quotations is searches the words as a whole not one or the other

 

7.)is this article scholarly or popular

Popular because it not a peer reviewed publication

 

10.)is this a scholarly work? What is one way you can tell

Yes, it’s publicated by cornell university press

 

WRITE THE FULL TITLE

GERMANYS IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Does muhlenberg own this title

No

How do you know?

I did not come up when we searched it

How can you obtain a free copy of this book

Click on request through interlibrary loan

 

2.)write down the call number

526.09 H673n

What suggest this is scholarly

Refrences to other scholarly subject and a bibliography

10 on 1

North America, As Divided Amongst the European Powers. 

 

  1. Drawn by a mathematician
  2. Has latitude and longitude lines
  3. Borders outlined in color
  4. Written in english
  5. East coast more detailed than west coast
  6. Drawn January 10, 1774
  7. California is a peninsula
  8. Only some states are represented
  9. Borders show split in european territories
  10. No concerns for native lands

 

3.) Borders outlined in colors

  • Shows only the territories owned by European countries
  • There are some states that are detailed
  • The entire North America is outlined by territories
  • Not lines are drawn on bodies of water

 

Why did Samuel Dunn, the author, include the lines in the first place. Was this mapped used to show the Kings and Queens? Why did Samuel Dunn go out of his way to draw this map? Maybe the map was shown to the leaders of Europe for a decision in how to divide the land up differently. The map doesn’t have any borders relating to the waters that surround North America. Maybe the borders are color coded to make the land seem more divided than it actually is. Maybe Dunn was trying to distort the land size owned by other countries other than his in order to have his map favored over other maps. Why did Dunn not care about the borders of native states? Did Dunn not have the knowledge that Indians owned land still in 1774? Why are the borders only related to the European nations? It is probably because Samuel Dunn is from Great Britain himself. Did the French still have land owned in 1774? In the map it doesn’t show a color distinction between France and Great Britain land. Dunn might be intending to leave France out because he is saying they are irrelevant and Britain is dominant in North America.

The Library Babel

He explains that the library will exist forever so therefore a god must have created it. When he is done living in the library he will be thrown over the railing like every other person that dies. I think he relates the books to the stories people have gone through. He mentions no two books are alike and every book is unique. Just like someone’s personal life story everyone is unique and no one will have the same life story. He also mentions that human existence may be temporary but the library will be forever. Therefore even when the last human dies the universe will still be growing with books and live forever. It’s hard to understand the meaning of The Library Babel.

Turchi Argument Final

           While reading the second chapter of Turchi’s book, Maps of the Imagination, we find out that the author has found some meaning to the gaps of information while interpreting a map. Turchi brings up these gaps of information (blank spaces) because he claims that the map makers are trying to give a meaning to the amount of information they draw and how the readers interpret the images. These blank spaces can be all the unmarked landscape on a map or the blanks in the names of buildings/streets. It is what the Map maker did not put on the map that creates the true meaning of that particular map. It may be the other way around, a map maker can put too much information on a map that might make the map useless and lose its meaning. We can see examples through the second chapter that shows us the that the amount of information is vital towards the meaning of a map.

             “The blank page, then, is only a beginning, as opposed to the beginning.” (Turchi 29). A quote like this one in the beginning of the chapter offers us a bone to pick at. Turchi bring up some examples in the second chapter of some “Putter Outers”, famously said by Thomas Wolfe.  These are the authors that leave out information so the readers can fill in the information themselves. Turchi explains that other authors are leaving out information on purpose so the readers are constantly asked question about the missing information.  Turchi brings up John Cage’s 4’33” as an examples of a putter outter. This is a musical piece that is strictly composed of only rests. The audience is left to imagine only what the composer meaning was to create a song with no sound. This is an example of complete blank space and it goes along with Rauschenberg’s art work of two completely blank white pieces of paper. These two pieces of art leaves the people wondering what the true meaning of the piece actually was. These two examples of putter outers shows us that the amount of information given to the on goers was too minimal to interpret the true meaning of the piece of art. “Kate Chopin’s “The Storm” is highly selective, leaps through white space, and propels us into the world of the unspoken” (Turchi 51). This example is a story only gives us bits and piece of a story and at the end it tells us that everything turned out fine and everyone was happy. This leaves us in confusing asking was everyone actually happy or not. The author purpose is to make a reader prose question like these in order to define the story’s meaning. The author is trying to leave the reader with just enough information that the interpretation can happen in the reader’s mind and not on the text. All examples of these “putter outers” give us a good reason as to why an author will leave out information to get his/her meaning across toward the reader.

           On the other hand, Turchi also refers to authors as “putter inners”. These are the authors that put in so much information that the sole purpose of the context is ruined and leaves a reader confused. Turchi brings up the name Thomas Wolfe who is famously known for sending trunks of manuscripts to his editor in which he was trying to make a point that too much information can be boring and ruin the entire meaning of the context. Trying to find that “carefully shaped, well-defined void” (Turchi 53) is the art of the creating something for other to understand with meaning.He also brings up a good point that some maps are made specifically for a certain type of person. Turchi explains that a map of the county bikes trails should only contain information that retains to bikers. If the biking map included bus stations, railroad tracks, or where the library was then the reader might get confused. A biker trying to read a map doesn’t need to be distracted by all the unnecessary information given to the map. It does not leave space for extra details that a biker would want to know in order to travel or navigate the map. Using these examples we can analyze that the extra information in a context doesn’t help the reader out with anything. In fact it only leaves the reader with more confusion that needed be.

           We as a people created the blank space – of the maps – in our minds. “The earth itself was never blank.” (Turchi 29). The earth was always full of detail but the cartographers paint the blank space in order to create a certain meaning to the landscape. The map makers, just like the authors, have full control of the information given out and by that they control the meaning behind every map. Some of them leave out too much information and some put in too much information but all as one they try to bring a meaning out of the context. Map makers control the information and by that control the meaning.